PETITION-ABOLISH-COLUMBUS-DAY-124626215443Almost anyone with a decent education already knows that Columbus did not discover America. Almost everyone knows that the Vikings were the first to set foot in what is now North America in the year 1000, about five hundred years prior to Columbus’ landing around a group of island south of Florida now called the Bahamas.

We know that Columbus and those who followed should be seen as insensitive to the nations they met, and reeked havoc with the people who greeted them with hospitality, or at least curiosity, soon finding out that the people from a far off land with wooden ships were arrogant and greedy souls who had the audacity of claiming land that did not belong to them. Imagine a group of people stepping off a private plane landing in a meadow in the middle of Iowa who after stepping from the plane claiming the land around Dubuque as now belonging to another country; it’s almost laughable, but that’s what happened by people we call explorers. It’s one thing to explore, but its another to exploit. It’s a bad legacy.

There is a recent movement to rename Columbus Day to something paying honor to the indigenous people inhabiting the United States. Though we have much to answer to regarding colonialism, and claiming land killing off a nation of peoples, I’m not sure re-framing Columbus Day is the answer.

Anthropology has said that the people who inhabited North America are best termed “First Nations” because these early travelers came to this land via the Bering Strait when Siberia and Alaska were connected. DNA research says that migration happened in three waves as far back as 25,000 years ago. So, by the time Europeans came into the picture, First Nation peoples were here on this land, and were quite well established. The important fact is that all who came here, no matter what point in history, are immigrants.

I think its time to lay Columbus Day to rest, and to recognize the importance and value of the United States as a nation of immigrants. All of us in this land are immigrants who came to this land over time, and from various waves if migration. My family came to the USA after World War I when Austria-Hungary was broken apart due to war and aggression. Similar stories such as mine can be found over various periods of history.

We, as a people, must set aside a day to recognize the value and importance of immigrants, and to realize that we, as a nation, is strong not from our independence, but our conglomeration of nations who chose to make this land our home, the ever mingling of people of different traditions, and ethnicity which makes us a beacon to the world.

Let’s end Columbus Day and call for a celebration named Immigrant’s Day. Immigrant’s Day, a time to reflect on how we came here, and how we can best serve, and open our hearts and hospitality who seek to make this land their home.