For some time those who follow religious trends have heard from Phyllis Tickle, and most recently Diana Butler Bass addressing a new awakening within the religious landscape in United States.  Both thinkers suggest religion is on the brink of something new which will eventually bring about a fresh new understanding of faith in our time. Oxford church historian Diarmaid MacCulloch suggests that throughout its long history, Christianity has managed to reinvent itself, adapting to new challenges morphing into a new existence. At present I wonder if we experiencing an awakening, or are we caught within a theological nightmare, unable to forge a new understanding because we can’t figure out what path to take?

A wise professor in seminary offered his concise subtext for the Hebrew Bible suggesting that the reason for its writing was to demonstrate why they (the Hebrew people) failed. What started out as a loving relationship with (notice I said with) God eventually dissipated into a misguided history of power, greed, and personal gain. One reason the writings found within the Old Testament remain is that the words continue to speak to faithful communities because humanity continues to deal with the effects of power, greed, and personal gain.

Great thinkers such as the late Marcus Borg, and John Dominic Crossan teach, among other things, by looking at socioeconomic, and anthropological underpinnings found within the early Christian movement we can recapture a better understanding of what Christianity is meant to be; something more than a promise of prosperity, the naming of sins, or telling people how to think, and act. In 325 C.E. Christianity entered the religious landscape as Empire itself, with the original message dedicated to socioeconomic change clouded by power, greed and personal gain.

Christianity, at its most basic level, is a gathering of people meeting over a shared meal dedicated to an effort bringing about a just world filled with diverse mutuality.With recent events in Baltimore, and other cities feeding an escalation of violence, with religious groups fighting for dominance with regard to marriage, and the continued disparity between rich and poor….I wonder about the church, and it’s crop of teachings which may have contributed to failures within society, inadvertently supporting socioeconomic realities, and the continuation of violence both physical, and verbal. I wonder:

  • Has the church spent far too much time teaching about an after life, when we should have stressed justice and peace in this life?
  • Has the church wasted too much energy arguing about creation myths when we should have been teaching faithful stewardship of our planet?
  • Has the church focused far too much time, energy and theology about who is in or out, when we should have placed greater energy celebrating diversity and mutuality?
  • Has the church taught a vertical hierarchical model when it should have stressed a linear-circular reality?

Before outreach can become effective, maybe it’s time for in-reach; a reexamination of the Rabbi from Nazareth who taught a monotheistic message of diverse mutuality, equal distribution, devotion to neighbor,  and good will towards all. Maybe the true teaching of the church might be to take back the world from power hungry, greedy bullies. Maybe its time to think of worship as a means of support for progressive action, enabling a gentle transformation, and subtle modulation of each local community around a church, focusing on the resurrection of human understanding and dignity for all.