Today is Ash Wednesday, a time when people of the Christian faith begin a 40 day journey culminating in the events of Holy Week leading to the celebration of Easter. Lent is a time when some people give up something which most times has nothing to do with a spiritual discipline, but merely a way to justify a 40 day diet which may or may not drop a few pounds off our frame. Some people give up sugar, or Facebook, or some other thing which for each individual has attained some form of pleasure.

Within modern spiritual practice, individuals sometimes take on something which may include a book study, or donating time to a worthy charity. Some decide to take a few moments in the day to sit quietly and seek inner peace while others may take on a new health regimen, or look to Lent as a short term variance based upon a New Year’s resolution almost forgotten.

Walking Feb. 17 2015This week our Mindful Walking reflection came from Albert Einstein as he spoke about imagination, he wrote, “I am enough of an artist to draw freely upon my imagination. Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world.”

I think these are appropriate words to kick off Lent as they challenge our notions of what reality is, and what’s contained within our private value system. Knowledge is relative to our personal experiences, but imagination suggests there is something more, a deeper and wider tomorrow promising a revelatory experience much more intense than first imagined.

Maybe a good Lenten practice might be to reacquaint oneself with our imagination, and see where it leads, and what our imagination says to our inner being. Maybe our imagination might spark new insights to truths we have refused to acknowledge because they may not fit into a tiny box we call reality.

Imagination allows our mind to soar, reaching new horizons, offering a momentary glimpse to see what’s at the end of the rainbow, or beyond the edge of the earth. Imagination allows a chance to open our spiritual door not only to acknowledge things seen, but things unseen as well.

Ted Kennedy’s eulogy for his slain brother Bobby quotes an adage which sums up the power of imagination:

“Some men see things as they are and say why.
I dream things that never were and say why not.”