[wil·der·ness] noun  (1) Graue festliche : a tract or region uncultivated and uninhabited by human beings (2) : an area essentially undisturbed by human activity together with its naturally developed life community. (3) :a confusing multitude or mass.

week-4

 Sounds

In the wilderness, without the consistent destructive hum of ambient noise, sounds are amplified to the point where they become life; a life within the center of a moment. Once while sleeping in a tent in the Yosemite Valley, John Muir heard the ache and groan of the earth, the sound of a rumble shouting through the ground. Then, as though the world had awoken from a deep sleep, the earth began to shake.  Muir, running from his tent stood amongst the granite, and the tall woods bending and snapping screaming, “O Glorious Quake!” He was not afraid, and he rejoiced with nature. The brook sang its tune as branches snapped and swayed; the ground danced its reveille, and Muir shouted with joy. Why did he cherish nature’s sounds as words, and why do we cower at the thought of nature making itself known? Could it be that he had submitted his personal will to nature’s glory, and we try with all our might to subordinate nature to our will?

What do nature’s pure sounds say to you, and how would you respond?